Nevada Civil Practice
Sec. § 21.130
Notice of sale under execution; separate notice for residential foreclosure.


1.

Before the sale of property on execution, notice of the sale, in addition to the notice required pursuant to NRS 21.075 and 21.076, must be given as follows:

(a)

In cases of perishable property, by posting written notice of the time and place of sale in three public places at the township or city where the sale is to take place, for such a time as may be reasonable, considering the character and condition of the property.

(b)

In case of other personal property, by posting a similar notice in three public places of the township or city where the sale is to take place, not less than 5 or more than 10 days before the sale, and, in case of sale on execution issuing out of a district court, by the publication of a copy of the notice in a newspaper, if there is one in the county, at least twice, the first publication being not less than 10 days before the date of the sale.

(c)

In case of real property, by:

(1)

Personal service upon each judgment debtor or by registered mail to the last known address of each judgment debtor and, if the property of the judgment debtor is operated as a facility licensed under chapter 449 of NRS, upon the State Board of Health;

(2)

Posting a similar notice particularly describing the property, for 20 days successively, in three public places of the township or city where the property is situated and where the property is to be sold;

(3)

Publishing a copy of the notice three times, once each week, for 3 successive weeks, in a newspaper, if there is one in the county. The cost of publication must not exceed the rate for legal advertising as provided in NRS 238.070. If the newspaper authorized by this section to publish the notice of sale neglects or refuses from any cause to make the publication, then the posting of notices as provided in this section shall be deemed sufficient notice. Notice of the sale of property on execution upon a judgment for any sum less than $500, exclusive of costs, must be given only by posting in three public places in the county, one of which must be the courthouse;

(4)

Recording a copy of the notice in the office of the county recorder; and

(5)

If the sale of property is a residential foreclosure, posting a copy of the notice in a conspicuous place on the property. In addition to the requirements of NRS 21.140, the notice must not be defaced or removed until the transfer of title is recorded or the property becomes occupied after completion of the sale, whichever is earlier.

2.

If the sale of property is a residential foreclosure, the notice must include, without limitation:

(a)

The physical address of the property; and

(b)

The contact information of the party who is authorized to provide information relating to the foreclosure status of the property.

3.

If the sale of property is a residential foreclosure, a separate notice must be posted in a conspicuous place on the property and mailed, with a certificate of mailing issued by the United States Postal Service or another mail delivery service, to any tenant or subtenant, if any, other than the judgment debtor, in actual occupation of the premises not later than 3 business days after the notice of the sale is given pursuant to subsection 1. The separate notice must be in substantially the following form:
NOTICE TO TENANTS OF THE PROPERTY
Foreclosure proceedings against this property have started, and a notice of sale of the property to the highest bidder has been issued.
You may either: (1) terminate your lease or rental agreement and move out; or (2) remain and possibly be subject to eviction proceedings under chapter 40 of the Nevada Revised Statutes. Any subtenants may also be subject to eviction proceedings.
Between now and the date of the sale, you may be evicted if you fail to pay rent or live up to your other obligations to the landlord.
After the date of the sale, you may be evicted if you fail to pay rent or live up to your other obligations to the successful bidder, in accordance with chapter 118A of the Nevada Revised Statutes.
Under the Nevada Revised Statutes, eviction proceedings may begin against you after you have been given a notice to surrender.
If the property is sold and you pay rent by the week or another period of time that is shorter than 1 month, you should generally receive notice after not less than the number of days in that period of time.
If the property is sold and you pay rent by the month or any other period of time that is 1 month or longer, you should generally receive notice at least 60 days in advance.
Under Nevada Revised Statutes 40.280, notice must generally be served on you pursuant to chapter 40 of the Nevada Revised Statutes and may be served by:

(1)

Delivering a copy to you personally in the presence of a witness, unless service is accomplished by a sheriff, constable or licensed process server, in which case the presence of a witness is not required;

(2)

If you are absent from your place of residence or usual place of business, leaving a copy with a person of suitable age and discretion at either place and mailing a copy to you at your place of residence or business and to the place where the leased property is situated, if different; or

(3)

If your place of residence or business cannot be ascertained, or a person of suitable age or discretion cannot be found there, posting a copy in a conspicuous place on the leased property and mailing a copy to you at the place where the leased property is situated.
If the property is sold and a landlord, successful bidder or subsequent purchaser files an eviction action against you in court, you will be served with a summons and complaint and have the opportunity to respond. Eviction actions may result in temporary evictions, permanent evictions, the awarding of damages pursuant to Nevada Revised Statutes 40.360 or some combination of those results.
Under the Justice Court Rules of Civil Procedure:

(1)

You will be given at least 10 days to answer a summons and complaint;

(2)

If you do not file an answer, an order evicting you by default may be obtained against you;

(3)

A hearing regarding a temporary eviction may be called as soon as 11 days after you are served with the summons and complaint; and

(4)

A hearing regarding a permanent eviction may be called as soon as 20 days after you are served with the summons and complaint.

4.

The sheriff shall not conduct a sale of the property on execution or deliver the judgment debtors property to the judgment creditor if the judgment debtor or any other person entitled to notice has not been properly notified as required in this section and NRS 21.075 and 21.076.

5.

As used in this section, residential foreclosure means the sale of a single family residence pursuant to NRS 40.430. As used in this subsection, single family residence means a structure that is comprised of not more than four units.
Source
Last accessed
Dec. 7, 2019