Nevada Public Health and Safety
Sec. § 453A.800
Costs associated with medical use of marijuana not required to be paid or reimbursed; medical use of marijuana not required to be allowed in workplace; medical needs of employee who engages in medical use of marijuana to be accommodated by employer, other than law enforcement agency, in certain circumstances.


The provisions of this chapter do not:

1.

Require an insurer, organization for managed care or any person or entity who provides coverage for a medical or health care service to pay for or reimburse a person for costs associated with the medical use of marijuana.

2.

Require any employer to allow the medical use of marijuana in the workplace.

3.

Except as otherwise provided in subsection 4, require an employer to modify the job or working conditions of a person who engages in the medical use of marijuana that are based upon the reasonable business purposes of the employer but the employer must attempt to make reasonable accommodations for the medical needs of an employee who engages in the medical use of marijuana if the employee holds a valid registry identification card, provided that such reasonable accommodation would not:

(a)

Pose a threat of harm or danger to persons or property or impose an undue hardship on the employer; or

(b)

Prohibit the employee from fulfilling any and all of his or her job responsibilities.

4.

Prohibit a law enforcement agency from adopting policies and procedures that preclude an employee from engaging in the medical use of marijuana.

5.

As used in this section, law enforcement agency means:

(a)

The Office of the Attorney General, the office of a district attorney within this State or the Nevada Gaming Control Board and any attorney, investigator, special investigator or employee who is acting in his or her professional or occupational capacity for such an office or the Nevada Gaming Control Board; or

(b)

Any other law enforcement agency within this State and any peace officer or employee who is acting in his or her professional or occupational capacity for such an agency.
Source
Last accessed
Nov. 17, 2019